It’s said that a single sneeze may produce up to 40,000 droplets, which may leave your mouth at speeds of more than 200 miles per hour.1 While some of the heavier droplets will fall to the floor, others remain airborne and are quickly circulated around the room. If the droplet is infected with a virus, and you inhale it, the video shows how a single virus can quickly begin producing millions of copies within your cells.

It’s a frightening prospect, until you realize that your body has more than 1 trillion cells making 1 million viruses a mere drop in the bucket.

Also important, your body is equipped with its own highly effective defense system your immune system that starts killing viruses almost as quickly as they are produced. As long as your immune system can stay one step ahead of the virus, you’ll feel better again quickly and in some cases may not even know you were “sick.”

If you listen to public health agencies, you’ll quickly hear the message that ‘the first and most important step in protecting against the flu’ is yearly vaccination. But upon what data is this strong recommendation based?

During the 2012-2013 flu season, the flu vaccine’s effectiveness was found to be just 56 percent across all age groups reviewed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in essence, the statistical equivalent of a coin toss. In seniors, aged 65 and over, the US flu vaccines were only 9 percent effective.

Read more at: //articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/01/06/flu-attack.aspx